Marcel Häusler’s One Poster a Day

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Published:  June 23, 2015
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In 2014, Hamburg-based Marcel Häusler challenged himself to create one poster a day for a year. The posters, published daily on Häusler’s blog, covered a range of topics and ideas – from daily experiences to the issues that entered worldwide consciousness. 52 posters from Häusler’s time capsule of 2014’s good, bad and ugly moments were exhibited recently at the 3sec.gallery: a drive-by exhibition space along the entrance to a car park in Breda, Netherlands.

All words and posters by Marcel Häusler

As a critical thinker and designer, you always want to communicate your point of view. One Poster A Day was the chance to work completely independently — what topic to choose and how to work it out in the design were decisions I could make autonomously, without the need to explain the way I was doing things. I was very curious about what effect the project would have on myself, on my attitude towards design and the methods I use to design. And I wanted to find out if I really could keep going. To quote the poster of February 14th 2014, “Push you! Push you real hard!”

A lot of terrifying things happened last year. One thing that really touched me was the beginning of the unrest in Ukraine. It started in Kiev, in the city’s central square, Maidan Nezalezhnosti. I remember when the newspapers reported a night of fights where 25 people were killed. This forced me to design a poster, for which I used a lyric by music-duo Disclosure: “When a fire starts to burn, it starts to spread.” Later in the year I designed a small series of posters all dealing with ongoing conflicts: the civil war in Syria, the already mentioned unrest in Ukraine, and the conflict between the State of Palestine and Israel. The series ended with a poster illustrating the hope of everybody, that there will be peace, hopefully someday.

November 1

November 1

August 26

August 26

Other public events made it into the posters: the Malaysia Airlines catastrophes, the global forced displacement and increasing amount of refugees, and the fight against Ebola, for example. But there were also funny things that made it into the posters.

I found inspiration in nearly everything that was happening around me and my friends, in Hamburg or in the world. Sometimes I used daily episodes as stimuli. For example: I remember a day I was booked in an agency and I spent most of that day waiting for feedback instead of working. So I communicated the feeling of waiting in the poster. The posters often dealt with personal feelings. Sometimes it became a very hard pressure, having to design a poster every single day. So these feelings about pressure, compulsion, strain, boredom or emptiness became topics for posters also.

I didn’t do any pre-planning of posters. In the first month I challenged myself to finish each poster before the end of the day. This became very tough, especially when I was tired of working a whole day and then forced myself to design a poster. I found out that it was more effective to finish a poster the following day.

Of course, there a lot of posters I would have liked to change. But I decided to see every poster as self-contained. Once I uploaded a poster to the website, I didn’t touch it again. It became a visual diary entry of that day. Now the variety of good, bad and ugly posters creates a well-documented reflection of my last year.

October 8

October 8

June 6

June 6

February 24

February 24

I learned to write down ideas, phrases, quotations or any other interesting things immediately. Also, I developed the good practice to drag and drop pictures I find to a folder. This is still a rich fund of ideas, not only for posters.

And I learned to take pause in my design process. I often worked on posters in very short time periods, sometimes less than 15 minutes. But forced interruptions don’t harm the design. Instead they became a good time out for you rethink an idea and to develop it.

Uploading poster number 356 on December 31 was such a great moment, which is still hard to describe. To know that I really kept going and designed all these posters is an awesome feeling. And now it’s nice to see the posters spreading through the world.

marcelhaeusler.de

oneposteraday.com

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