Who’s making all that noise?

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Published:  January 27, 2010
Who’s making all that noise?

Moving to Melbourne just after winning the CREATE:Awards Design for Print Creative category in 2007, Racket have now settled right in to the swing of things. With a strong background in design, visual arts and human ecology Racket’s work always seems to take a unique approach marked by a well developed signature style all of their own. Collage meets illustration meets digital goodness mashed together in a kind of creative goulash that you won’t find anywhere else.

Copyright Racket

Copyright Racket

First of all – who are you and where do you come from?
We are Paul Mosig and Rachel Peachey, and currently we are living and working in Melbourne in an overflowing studio at the end of our house.

Copyright Racket

Copyright Racket

Can you tell me about Racket and how it came to be?
Paul was working as a web designer until he chucked it in to go to art school in Canberra, which is where we met and started collaborating on art projects. We had the odd design job here and there and when we moved to Melbourne it just kind of snowballed, and we started to take our design work much more seriously.

Copyright Racket

Copyright Racket

How would you describe Racket’s style/ ethos?
Quite a few of our clients have found us after seeing our artwork at exhibitions or online so they are often looking for that kind of style – which I guess uses a lot of collage, found images and objects, is textural and sometimes a bit moody. We have also been quite lucky in that we really like and believe in the work that our clients do, so we haven’t had to have to many soul searching moments where we have had to decide whether or not to support practices that we don’t believe in. Most of our clients are cultural and community organisations or independent artists and businesses, and we really enjoy working in that kind of environment.

Copyright Racket

Copyright Racket

Can you tell us about your set-up/ studio?
We work from home, which gives us lots of flexibility and also gives us more opportunity to hang out with our son who likes to help in the studio by driving trucks over everything and baking our paperwork in the ‘oven’ cupboard. It can be a bit chaotic, but it definitely has its benefits. When we have larger projects or need skills we don’t have we have subcontractors that help us out.

Copyright Racket

Copyright Racket

What’s the biggest lesson you have learnt in your career so far, and how did that come to pass?
There is only so long you can keep going without any kind of business plan or structure. Because we started so organically and learnt all the aspects of the business on the go we have had quite a few disasters that could of been avoided with some better planning. We are also getting to the point where we have more work coming in than we can take on so we are learning how to say no – which is a lot harder than you would think.

Copyright Racket

Copyright Racket

Who are some fellow creative people you admire and what inspires you?
Kahn and Selesnick, Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison, Julien Pacaud, Ben Pieratt, and Michael Freimuth. We also like travelling, old things, abandoned places, rain, and people.

Copyright Racket

Copyright Racket

You do use a lot of collage in your work – what inspired this method and why?
We both really love collecting old images, searching through old books at op shops, making ‘zines and traditional cut and paste collage. So the move to doing it digitally came from there and we really got into the way we could tell quite complex layered stories in the one image.

When you receive a brief, what processes do you follow to make sure it all comes together as smoothly as possible?
We find this is quite an evolving process that changes all the time as we have more experience with different types of clients and the kinds of things that can derail the process. In general though we go through the brief together and then meet with the client to go through all the issues we feel like might become important. We try to be upfront with the way we do things, and try and gauge what their expectations are – both for the work and their relationship with us and how much interaction they expect. Getting back to people as soon as possible and making sure they know where the project is up to is also pretty valuable.

Copyright Racket

Copyright Racket

Can you tell me about some of the photography on your website? What inspires you and what do you love about the medium?
Photography is the basis for most of our fine art work and the photography on the site is generally development work that doesn’t necessarily fit into a particular project. We love it because it is so immediate and evocative, it can be abstract, it can tell stories, there is an interesting relationship between the subject and the photographer – that and neither of us can draw very well.

What’s up next for you guys?
We are doing an interesting job for the community arts organisation Big hART, it is a box filled with things that showcase a series of projects that they have done over the last few years, so it includes CDs and DVDs, and also folds out to become a board game. Their information cards are also a large puzzle, so we have had some pretty funny brainstorming sessions trying to design a relevant game. We are also working on some large sculptural works and limited edition prints as well as desperately trying to find the time to re-haul our website to combine all of our art and design work in the one place.

www.studioracket.org

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