Out now: desktop’s October issue looks to a Brave New World

AUTHOR:  
Published:  October 8, 2015
Katia Pase

 

This October, desktop gets harder, better, faster, stronger. Taking authorial and public design as its theme, this issue is about visual innovation in public projects, their role in shaping our world, and the question: who controls culture?

Toko responds to Australia Council funding

Toko responds to Australia Council funding

In a special feature, desktop commissioned a cross-section of the country’s leading studios, independent practitioners and graphic artists to create a poster in response to the recent restructure and reassignment of arts funding in Australia, which threatens the livelihood of cultural activity and small to medium arts organisations across the performing arts, visual arts, literature and publishing sectors. The results, taken up in a personal or political way as motivated by the contributors, including Kevin Finn, Toko and Sam Wallman, gravitate between optimistic, motivated, fearless and impassioned about the ecology of creativity in this country. Kevin Finn’s ‘Brave New World’ is also featured on the issue’s cover.

Cover for the October issue, by Kevin Finn

Cover for the October issue, by Kevin Finn

In a long-form feature Aidan Connolly looks into recent examples of striking government-issued design projects out of Europe, and at the messages being sent and received. What does it mean, to design a national identity? Is such a thing possible?

We catch up with agencies both here and abroad pushing the expectations of public service announcements, and the opportunities for humour and surprise in public discourse. Shareability from the US poke fun at pop-culture artefacts (above), while two Dutch designers borrow from the countercultural visual language of the 1960s to make a publication about urban infrastructure surprisingly stunning. Frost*collective chats about a public health program it has been evolving for almost half a decade, while M&C Saatchi uses a very different vehicle to communicate its client’s health messaging. AGDA sits down with Memefest’s Oliver Vodeb to find alternative value frameworks to define ‘what good design’ is.

Maak Plaats, by Florian Mewes and Alfons Hooikaas

Maak Plaats, by Florian Mewes and Alfons Hooikaas

AGDA Presents: Oliver Vodeb

AGDA Presents: Oliver Vodeb

Elsewhere in the issue we feature the work of young photographer Prue Stent, whose striking presentation of female bodies bound in stifling fabric crashes the public and the private, disrupts the political and the personal. Meanwhile, Ollie Campbell from Navy Design reclaims a space to face the empty page by introducing ‘quiet time’ into the studio environment. “All great design is about intentionality,” writes Campbell, “and designing how we work should be no different.”

Prue Stent

Prue Stent

Plus special commissions by Carla McRae, Minna Gilligan, Daniel Gray and more.


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